Sunday, April 9, 2017

Review: Compulsion (Heirs of Watson Island #1)

Martina Boone. New York: Simon Pulse, 2014. Ebook.
Rating: Decent

Goodreads SummaryThree plantations. Two wishes. One ancient curse.

All her life, Barrie Watson had been a virtual prisoner in the house where she lived with her shut-in mother. When her mother dies, Barrie promises to put some mileage on her stiletto heels. But she finds a new kind of prison at her aunt’s South Carolina plantation instead--a prison guarded by an ancient spirit who long ago cursed one of the three founding families of Watson Island and gave the others magical gifts that became compulsions.

Stuck with the ghosts of a generations-old feud and hunted by forces she cannot see, Barrie must find a way to break free of the family legacy. With the help of sun-kissed Eight Beaufort, who knows what Barrie wants before she knows herself, the last Watson heir starts to unravel her family's twisted secrets. What she finds is dangerous: a love she never expected, a river that turns to fire at midnight, a gorgeous cousin who isn’t what she seems, and very real enemies who want both Eight and Barrie dead.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Review: The Education of Margot Sanchez

Lilliam Rivera. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2017.
Rating: Decent


Goodreads Summary: Pretty in Pink comes to the South Bronx in this bold and romantic coming-of-age novel about dysfunctional families, good and bad choices, and finding the courage to question everything you ever thought you wanted—from debut author Lilliam Rivera.

THINGS/PEOPLE MARGOT HATES:

Mami, for destroying my social life
Papi, for allowing Junior to become a Neanderthal
Junior, for becoming a Neanderthal
This supermarket
Everyone else

After “borrowing” her father's credit card to finance a more stylish wardrobe, Margot Sanchez suddenly finds herself grounded. And by grounded, she means working as an indentured servant in her family’s struggling grocery store to pay off her debts.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

My Favorite Word by Nikki Grimes

Love this post! Reposted from the Nerdy Book Club.

MY FAVORITE WORD BY NIKKI GRIMES

At a recent school visit, a student posed a wonderful question during Q & A.  “What is your favorite word?” he asked me.  Caught off guard, I said the first thing that popped into my head.  “Dream,” I told him, “because it opens up endless possibilities.”  It wasn’t a bad answer, but it wasn’t the only one I could have come up with.  If I’d considered it a little longer, I might have said, “Hope.”
Hope is the how of surviving my childhood, and the why of the stories I tell.  I can’t imagine a world without it.

Saturday, December 31, 2016

Review: The Cure for Dreaming

Cat Winters. New York: Amulet Books, 2014.  352 pp.
Rating: Striking 
"Think of your future sons and daughters. Think how much better your childhood would have been if your mother had accepted her place in the world and ignored her selfish dreams." (60)
Oh, the cover, the cover! (squeals loudly) Love, love, love! I'm lucky to have scored a poster of the cover during TCfD Book Tour. The imagery is fantastic! The cover sets the atmosphere of what lies between the pages. The cumbersome garments, the strings tied around Olivia's skirt, and the buttons of her boots represent the bondage, the stagnant station of womanhood—the result of being born of the fairer sex. 
Where is a woman's place? Is it inside or outside the home? Is it both? What is a woman's role in the world and who decides her fate? 

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

How Many Lives Does A Book Live?

Yesterday, I was sorting through a box of children's books a co-worker had given me. Almost all of the books had a name scribbled inside the front cover. These names were of individuals who previously owned the book. Some of the books had graced a classroom shelf, a home library, and others a child's bedroom bookshelf. I then began to ponder about the lives of books. I'm not speaking of the life of a particular title or a new, fresh-from-the bookstore book, but a used hardcover or paperback book. A book that has been read, shared, and passed around from parent to child, sibling to sibling, and friend to friend.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Thinking to Inking: Pick Up Your Pen And Write. Your Voice Matters.

Reblogged from Thinking to Inking 

My comment on this post: Yes, all of this! Despite everything else I was feeling this morning, I woke up determined. Stacy, your post put into words my attitude going forward.

Thinking to Inking: Pick Up Your Pen And Write. Your Voice Matters.: I was supposed to post our monthly YA book pick today, but in light of everything that's happened it doesn't feel right. Some of y...

Thursday, September 29, 2016

September 2016 YA Releases

Yes, I do know that there's only one more day in September, but that's not going to stop me from posting a pic of my September releases. After stalking my order status for a week, the last book I'd been awaiting finally arrived. Now, I can exhibit my new babies for all to see. :) I've been wanting to get my hands on each of these books once I learned of them. Look at these pretties! I cannot wait to read them!

From L to R...Into White by Randi Pink, The Female of the Species
by Mindy McGinnis, Labyrinth Lost by  Zoraida C√≥rdova


Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Suicide Prevention Book Display

Earlier this month, two students within my county committed suicide on the same day. Their deaths were unrelated as one was a middle school student and the other high school, as well as, they occurred in different areas of the county. These latest deaths continues to secure Carroll's reign as the county with the highest suicide rate in the state of Georgia.

To call attention to this pressing issue, last evening, September 27, the community came to together to discuss ways to prevent suicide. Although the community did not swarm in masses, and the gathering consisted mostly of individuals representing social organizations, below is my contribution to the event. Referencing reading lists from School Library Journal and the Nerdy Book Club, I created a display of Young Adult books relating to depression and suicide. Many of the resources on the Information and After Care table were provided by a member of our local Survivors of Suicide group--I just set-up the display. I left the program one book lighter as a teen borrowed a book from the YA display. Success!

Tweens & Teens Biblotherapy Table
Adult Nonfiction titles & Resource Information Table


Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Review: Rising From the Ashes: The Chronicles of Caymin (The Dragonmage Saga #1)

Caren J. Werlinger. Corgyn Publishing, 2016. 295 pp.
Rating: Worthy + 5 Scoops

Fantasy isn't my go to genre. Truthfully, it's never really been on my radar. Not because I despised it, but because I hadn't been introduced to it. Many times as I read blog posts or hear readers talk about beloved fantasy stories, I feel that I've missed out on many great books during my formative years. While others were discovering and feeding their love of fantasy in middle and junior high school, I was re-reading, for the umpteenth time, the books that adorned my bedroom bookshelf. It wasn't because I loved them so much, but because I simply didn't know what else to read.  Now with each fantasy novel I complete, the shovel drops another load filling in the hollow pit of my non-fantasy reading life. Soon though, this book hole shall be jam-packed!

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Author Interview: Kisha Mitchell/Book Launch Party of Brown Girl, Brown Girl, What Do You See?

It's approaching one o'clock and Central Library, the Headquarters of the Atlanta Public Library System, is abuzz with activity. Finishing touches are being applied to display tables and people are quietly strolling in. Grinning joyously, Kisha Mitchell, commences the launch of her debut picture book, Brown Girl, Brown Girl, What Do You See? It was a pleasure to attend the book launch and have the opportunity to meet and interview Author Kisha Mitchell.



How did you develop your love of books, reading, and writing?
I didn't have a TV in my room until I was nineteen. As a kid, I read to pass the time. I read such series as GoosebumpsThe Baby-Sitters Club, and many others.